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Cancer Screenings

Early Detection Saves Lives

From screening through diagnosis to treatment and survivorship, RWJBarnabas Health and Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey provides exceptional expertise and knowledge in all types of cancer. As New Jersey’s only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center we offer the most advanced diagnostic modalities and treatment options.

MammogramMany cancers can be detected early through regular screenings. Early detection of any cancer improves outcomes. It is important to speak to your health care provider about the appropriate screenings and schedule for you. Most screenings are covered by insurance.

Please note: your family medical history or your personal health issues can modify these screening guidelines. Talk with your healthcare provider about the best screening plan for you.

  • Breast Cancer Screenings

breast cancer

  • Women age 40 to 44 should have the opportunity to begin annual breast cancer screening with a mammogram.
  • Women age 45 to 54 should get a mammogram every year.
  • Women 55 and older should switch to mammograms every two years, or can continue yearly screening.
  • Screening should continue as long as a woman is in good health and is expected to live 10 more years or longer.
  • Women are encouraged to know how their breasts normally feel and report any breast changes promptly to their healthcare providers.

Schedule a Mammogram

  • Colorectal Cancer Screenings

colon cancer

  • Beginning at age 45, people of average risk for colorectal cancer should follow one of these six testing schedules as recommended by your healthcare provider:
    • Yearly guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT)*
    • Yearly fecal immunochemical test (FIT)*
    • Multi-target stool DNA test every three years*
    • Flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years*
    • Colonoscopy every 10 years
      * If the test is positive, a colonoscopy should be done.
  • If you are at high risk of colon cancer based on family history or other factors, you may need to be screened using a different schedule. Talk with your healthcare provider about your history and the testing plan that’s best for you.
  • A person in good health should continue regular screening through age 75.
  • For people ages 76-85, talk with your healthcare provider about whether continuing to get screened is right for you.

Make an appointment with one of our health care providers to talk about what colon cancer screening is right for you.

  • Lung Cancer Screenings

lung cancer

  • Adults aged 50 to 80 years who have a 20 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years should be screened for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (CT) every year.
    • A pack-year is a way of calculating how much a person has smoked in their lifetime. One pack-year is the equivalent of smoking an average of 20 cigarettes—1 pack—per day for a year.
  • Screening should stop once a person has not smoked for 15 years or has a health problem that limits life expectancy or the ability to have lung surgery.
  • Before getting screened, you should talk to your health care provider about:
    • Your risk for lung cancer
    • How you can quit smoking, if you still smoke
    • The possible benefits, limits, and harms of lung cancer screening

Learn more about our Lung Cancer Screening Programs

  • Prostate Cancer Screenings

prostate cancer

  • A Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) screening test can be utilized for patients who may be at risk of prostate cancer. However, men at average risk should speak to their healthcare provider to discuss the pros and cons of prostate cancer screening starting at age 45.
  • If you are African American or have a father or brother who had prostate cancer before age 65, you should talk to your healthcare provider about screening beginning at age 40.
  • If you decide to be tested, you should have the PSA test with or without a digital rectal exam. How often you are tested will depend on your PSA level.

Make an appointment with one of our health care providers to talk about what prostate cancer screening is right for you.

  • Cervical Cancer Screenings

cervical cancer

  • Cervical cancer screening should begin at age 25.
  • Women aged 25 to 65 should have a primary HPV test every five years. If primary HPV testing is not available, women should have a Pap test and an HPV test every five years (this is preferred) or have the Pap test alone every three years.
  • Those over age 65 who have had regular screening in the past 10 years with normal results and no history of CIN2 or more serious diagnosis within the past 25 years should stop cervical cancer screening. Once stopped, it should not be started again.
  • Women who have had a total hysterectomy (removal of the uterus and cervix) should stop screening (such as Pap tests and HPV tests), unless the hysterectomy was done as a treatment for cervical cancer or serious pre-cancer. People who have had a hysterectomy without removal of the cervix (called a supra-cervical hysterectomy) should continue cervical cancer screening according to the guidelines above.
  • People who have been vaccinated against HPV should still follow these guidelines for their age groups.

Make an appointment with one of our gynecologists by calling 888-724-7123.

To schedule an appointment with one of our cancer specialists please call
844-CANCERNJ or 844-226-2376.

Patient Stories

  • Do not delay getting your routine mammograms-and any recommended follow-up!

    Su
    Read More
  • I want to be a pillar of what a strong woman looks like. Not only my children, but to everyone.

    Amy
    Read More
  • I was 34, I didn’t think anything bad could happen to a 34 year old.

    Katlyn
    Read More

Patient Stories

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Saint Barnabas Medical Center
94 Old Short Hills Road
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(973) 322-5000
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300 Second Avenue
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(732) 222-5200
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The Unterberg Children's Hospital at Monmouth Medical Center
300 2nd Avenue
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(732) 923-7250
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Monmouth Medical Center Southern Campus
600 River Avenue
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4013 Route 9
Suite 2S
Howell, NJ 07731
(732) 923-7700
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The Jacqueline M. Wilentz Breast Center at Lakewood
600 River Ave
Lakewood, NJ 08701
(732) 923-7700
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Medical Specialty Services at Bayonne
16 East 29th Street
Bayonne, NJ 07002
(973) 926-7280
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The Family Health Center (FHC) at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center
166 Lyons Avenue
Newark, NJ 07112
(973) 926-7300
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The Jacqueline M. Wilentz Breast Center at Colts Neck
310 Route 34 South
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Colts Neck, NJ 07722
(732) 923-7700
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Community Medical Center
99 Highway 37 West
Toms River, NJ 08755
(732) 557-8000
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Newark Beth Israel Medical Center
201 Lyons Avenue at Osborne Terrace
Newark, NJ 07112
(973) 926-7000
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Children's Hospital of New Jersey at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center
201 Lyons Avenue at Osborne Terrace
Newark, NJ 07112
(973) 926-7000
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The Jacqueline M. Wilentz Breast Center at Monmouth Medical Center
300 Second Avenue
Long Branch, NJ 07740
(732) 923-7700
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Cristie Kerr Women's Health Center
377 Jersey Avenue
Ground Floor, Medical Office Building
Jersey City, NJ 07302
(877) 393-5374
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Community Medical Center Women's Imaging Center - Toms River
368 Lakehurst Rd
1st Floor
Toms River, NJ 08755
(732) 557-3363
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Center for Breast Health and Disease Management - Westfield
560 Springfield Ave
Westfield, NJ 07090
(973) 322-7020
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Barnabas Health Ambulatory Care Center
200 South Orange Avenue
Livingston, NJ 07039
(973) 322-7000
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Jersey City Medical Center
355 Grand Street
Jersey City, NJ 07302
(201) 915-2000
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Monmouth Medical Center Outpatient Infusion Center
100 State Route 36 West
West Long Branch, NJ 07764
(732) 222-6046
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Center for Breast Health and Disease Management - Livingston
200 South Orange Avenue
Suite 102
Livingston, NJ 07039
(973) 322-7020
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Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
125 Paterson Street
Clinical Academic Building (CAB)
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
(732) 235-6200
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Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group at Monroe
800 Bunn Drive
Suite 303
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 655-5178
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Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group
18 Centre Drive
Clinical Academic Building (CAB)
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
(609) 655-5178
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Cancer Center at RWJ Hamilton
2575 Klockner Road
Hamilton Township, NJ 08690
(609) 631-6960
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The Bristol-Myers Squibb Children's Hospital at RWJUH
200 Somerset Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
(732) 828-3000
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RWJ University Hospital Hamilton
1 Hamilton Health Place
Hamilton, NJ 08690
(609) 586-7900
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Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
1 Robert Wood Johnson Place
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
(732) 828-3000
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RWJ University Hospital Rahway
865 Stone Street
Rahway, NJ 07065
(732) 381-4200
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RWJ University Hospital Somerset
110 Rehill Avenue
Somerville, NJ 08876
(908) 685-2200
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Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey
195 Little Albany St.
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
(732) 235-2465
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Laurie Proton Therapy Center
141 French Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
(732) 253-3176
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Jersey City Medical Center Radiation Oncology
631 Grand Street
Jersey City, NJ 07304
(844) 226-2376
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Madeline Fiadini LoRe Foundation Infusion Center
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Suite 9
Jersey City, NJ 07302
(201) 915-2735
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