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Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatogram (ECRP)

Digestive Health Procedures in New Jersey

An endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ECRP) is used as both a diagnostic and treatment procedure for issues concerning the bile and pancreatic ducts. This procedure is typically recommended for patients who have had chronic stomach pains and/or jaundice. Complications are rare, but can be serious, so most physicians will not recommend it unless they believe they will need to perform treatment on the pancreatic or bile ducts.

ECRPs are commonly used as a treatment for:

  • Gallstones
  • Tumors in the pancreas or bile ducts
  • Pancreatitis
  • Blockage of the pancreas
  • Jaundice
  • Stomach pains

The ECRP Process

ECRPs are performed with a thin, flexible scope equipped with small tools. While patients are sedated, this tube is passed through the throat, into the stomach, and finally makes its way to the place where the common bile duct and pancreatic duct meet the small bowel. With a visual of these internal structures, the doctor can now confirm a diagnosis or perform treatments as needed.

ECRP—what to expect and how to prepare:

  • You will need to fast at least eight hours before your procedure, meaning no eating or drinking, including water, mints, and gum.
  • If you have prescribed medications or antibiotics, discuss this with your doctor. You may be able to take small sips of water for medications that will not interfere with the procedure.
  • Sedation is a necessary part of the procedure, so someone will need to drive you home afterward.
  • When the scope reaches its destination, the doctor will use a combination of X-rays and contrast dye to view the inside of the pancreatic and bile ducts.
  • If necessary, treatments are performed. These may include a biopsy, gallstone removal, widening of the bile duct, or placing a stent.

When the ECRP has concluded, you will be taken to the Post Anesthesia Care Suit to rest. A temporary sore throat and bloated stomach are normal side effects and should go away after a couple of days. Contact your doctor if you experience nausea, vomiting, increased belly pain, or fever.

Once you have recovered from sedation, your doctor will discuss the results and whether or not any further treatment is necessary.

Monmouth Medical Center Southern Campus
600 River Avenue
Lakewood, NJ 08701
(732) 363-1900
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Saint Barnabas Medical Center
94 Old Short Hills Road
Livingston, NJ 07039
(973) 322-5000
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Monmouth Medical Center
300 Second Avenue
Long Branch, NJ 07740
(732) 222-5200
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Clara Maass Medical Center
1 Clara Maass Drive
Belleville, NJ 07109
(973) 450-2000
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Community Medical Center
99 Highway 37 West
Toms River, NJ 08755
(732) 557-8000
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Newark Beth Israel Medical Center
201 Lyons Avenue at Osborne Terrace
Newark, NJ 07112
(973) 926-7000
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Children's Hospital of New Jersey at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center
201 Lyons Avenue at Osborne Terrace
Newark, NJ 07112
(973) 926-7000
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Jersey City Medical Center
355 Grand Street
Jersey City, NJ 07302
(201) 915-2000
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RWJ University Hospital Rahway
865 Stone Street
Rahway, NJ 07065
(732) 381-4200
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RWJ University Hospital Hamilton
1 Hamilton Health Place
Hamilton, NJ 08690
(609) 586-7900
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RWJ University Hospital New Brunswick
1 Robert Wood Johnson Place
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
(732) 828-3000
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Barnabas Health Ambulatory Care Center
200 South Orange Avenue
Livingston, NJ 07039
(973) 322-7000
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The Unterberg Children's Hospital at Monmouth Medical Center
300 Second Avenue
Long Branch, NJ 07740
(732) 923-7250
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