Simone H My Thriving Twin: Simone’s Story

Thanks to one of the best Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) doctors in the country, Simone’s treatment was already started.

“At, our eight-week ultrasound, we were saddened to only see one baby. The other baby “vanished.” We walked away feeling sad, but yet happy that we still had one miracle.”

“Simone Harmony arrived on May 11, 2019, Mother’s Day weekend, weighing 1 pound, 6 ounces. It was a bittersweet day after having a history of a lost pregnancy at 24 weeks and 1 day, less than a year ago. During my pregnancy with Simone, my husband and I went for our four-week ultrasound to check the length of the baby. To my surprise, the baby measured a lot bigger than anticipated. My OB/GYN ran some blood work and told me to come back in a week to make sure things were going well.

When we returned, my doctor surprised us and told us that I was pregnant with identical twins. My husband and I were ecstatic, to see the babies grow and hear two heartbeats. At, our eight-week ultrasound, we were saddened to only see one baby. The other baby “vanished.” We walked away feeling sad, but yet happy that we still had one miracle. As the weeks went by, our excitement grew.

At 24 weeks and 4 days PROM (Premature Rupture of Membranes) began to happen. My OB/GYN was out of town for Mother’s Day weekend. I felt scared and alone but luckily, I had the support of all the high-risk doctors and nurses to help us at this difficult time. I was kept in the hospital for monitoring and given magnesium and steroid shots to strengthen the baby’s lungs. After staying in the hospital on bed rest, I went to bathroom and I had a sharp pain in my back. The doctors rushed in to do an ultrasound. To my surprise, the baby’s foot was coming out. The doctor decided to deliver the baby at 25 weeks via emergency C-section. It was a bittersweet delivery. I was shocked that I had another premature pregnancy.

Simone HarmonyAfter Simone was born, I spiked a fever and had trouble breathing. The nurses and medical doctors swarmed my post-op room. I became scared and worried that Simone may have the same symptoms as I had. Thanks to one of the best Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) doctors in the country, Simone’s treatment was already started. On the other hand, I was diagnosed with cold sepsis and given IV fluids along with oxygen to assist my breathing.

After 6 days in the hospital, I was discharged while Simone’s journey was just beginning. On her second day at the hospital, I called the NICU to see how she was doing. The nurse said, “She scared us because she extubated herself.” That means she pulled out the tube that was helping her breathe. From then on, I knew she was a “fighter and determined” to get what she wants.

As the days and weeks passed, she needed several blood transfusions, intubation, extubation, a PICC line, steroids to help her get off the respirator, a feeding tube in her mouth then transitioned to her nose, and a lot of Kangaroo time. In spite of all the treatments Simone had in the NICU, Simone’s only diagnosis was extreme prematurity.

It was a blessing that Simone was discharged home with just vitamins and an apnea monitor, which she grew out of pretty quickly. Simone enjoyed the music therapist’s visits during her feeding time. She passed all head ultrasounds and all vision and hearing tests. Simone went home from the NICU after 100 days (close to her due date). I saw the NICU as my second home. I would pump breast milk to give to Simone, visit the library to gather books to read to Simone, and eat lunch (and sometimes dinner) in the hospital. Simone is currently a smart and active 2-year-old who has reached all of her milestones, thus far. She is truly a living Miracle!”

-Lionel and Courtney

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