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Curbside Manner: Provider Education Series

Geared towards multidisciplinary providers interested in the integration of social factors into the clinical setting, Curbside Manner: Health Beyond the Hospital offers valuable lessons from national thought‐leaders who have lived and learned experience in the social determinants of health arena.

Through this interactive series, providers will become well-equipped to address the social and behavioral needs of ALL patients. Curbside Manner: Health Beyond the Hospital is intended to provide critical information to every professional that touches the life of a patient. We encourage participation from individuals across disciplines - from physicians to intake workers, social workers to community outreach workers and everyone in between.

To learn more about each session and register, click the topics below:

Session 1: Finding a Balance – Integration Social Care into Clinical Settings

1 CEs available for physicians, pharmacists, nurses, social workers, and psychologists through Rutgers University

Register

Increasingly it has become evident that social and behavioral factors are critical to achieve optimal health. Therefore, clinicians must have the tools and the resources at their disposal to not only address their patients’ clinical needs, but also tackle tough issues such as hunger, homelessness, and domestic abuse. These are topics that extend far beyond what is taught in schools. These are life circumstances that are difficult for a patient to admit and for a provider to discuss. Many of these issues are polarizing and may be inherently fraught with prejudices and biases, conscious or unconscious. This initial session will provide healthcare workers with an overview of social determinants of health and why screening is important. It will underscore the importance of connecting patients to the appropriate resources to meet their identified needs and how best to discuss these needs on an on-going basis.

At the completion of Session 1: Finding a Balance, attendees will be able to:

  • Verbalize the need for SDOH screening across all patient populations and how the introduction of bias into the process can and has resulted in greater health inequity;
  • Proactively communicate effectively with ALL patients in a non‐judgmental manner about social and behavioral factors that affect health outcomes; and,
  • Understand the role data and technology play in patient‐centered care.

For a listing of speakers and to register for this session, click here.

Session 2: Unmasking Racism in Healthcare

1.25 CEs available for physicians, pharmacists, nurses, social workers, and psychologists through Rutgers University

Register

While founded on the principles of diversity and justice for all, racism is woven into the fabric of American history. Conscious or unconscious bias has insidiously taken root in every sector and as a result systemic racism has acted as a cancer that has plagued minority communities, resulting in inequitable health, social, educational and economic outcomes. The pandemic, paired with the recent civil injustices, have shone a light so bright on inequity and systemic racism that it is impossible and immoral to ignore. This session will provide healthcare workers with examples of how racism exists and its impact on health. It will also educate on the strategies for patient-centered care that can reduce mistrust, increase patient engagement and medical compliance, and improve health outcomes.

At the completion of Session 2: Unmasking Racism in Healthcare, attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the dual reality of racism and its effects on individual and collective perspectives;
  • Cite how the three levels of racism have contributed to poorer health outcomes; and,
  • List strategies of patient‐centered support that are culturally, linguistically, and educationally appropriate and can reduce mistrust, increase patient engagement and medical compliance, and improve health outcomes.

For a listing of speakers and to register for this session, click here.

Session 3: The Weight of Poor Nutrition

1.5 CEs available for physicians, pharmacists, nurses, social workers, and psychologists through Rutgers University

Register

Over 37 million individuals in America go to bed hungry and, overwhelmingly, 138 million Americans are obese. Both of these issues lead directly back to an inability to access good, nutritious foods and result in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and many others. By ensuring that patients are screened for issues such as lack of access to fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as understanding specific barriers to good nutrition, providers are better positioned to connect them to the resources they need to address their needs. From nutritional counseling to government programs, clinicians will learn the resources available to address the needs of their patients. They will understand culturally and linguistically appropriate ways to discuss sensitive issues such as food insecurity, hunger, and obesity. Finally, providers will be made aware of the ramifications and the costs to patients, health systems, and society when food insecurity persists.

At the completion of Session 3: The Weight of Poor Nutrition, attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the need to screen patients for food security, nutrition, and exercise habits;
  • Communicate effectively with patients about their current ability to access healthy food in a culturally and linguistically appropriate way;
  • Cite the barriers that exist for patients in accessing food supports;
  • Assess the types of programs and services available to individuals who are food insecure, obese, or who lack access to proper nutrition; and,
  • Screen and refer patients to the appropriate resources to connect individuals to services and supports.

For a listing of speakers and to register for this session, click here.

Session 4: Housing – A Key to Better Health

1 CEs available for physicians, pharmacists, nurses, social workers, and psychologists through Rutgers University

Register

Housing is healthcare. Safe and affordable housing has been evidenced to result in numerous positive outcomes, including improved physical and mental health; reduced healthcare costs; reduced food insecurity; and improved educational outcomes for children with increased lifetime earnings. While access to safe and affordable housing is not always readily available in every community, it is even more critical that healthcare providers understand the right questions to ask and the resources that are available to ensure that their patients’ homes are warm in the winter and cool in the summer; equipped with the safety features that they need; free from toxins such as lead, mold, pest infestation and animal dander; and that they are receiving other benefits and supports for which they are eligible to help defray the cost of housing. Concurrently, health is affected by the stressors associated by the financial burdens of owning a home and the neighborhood in which your home is located. For all of these reasons, housing is too important to health, social and economic outcomes to be ignored.

At the completion of Session 4: Housing, attendees will be able to:

  • Understand how housing issues affect health outcomes;
  • Discuss the historical context that has resulted in health inequity in low-income minority communities and how housing policy has played a role;
  • Communicate effectively with patients about their current living conditions in a culturally and linguistically appropriate manner;
  • Cite resources and innovations available to help patients improve their living conditions; and,
  • Use tools like the SDOH screening to connect patients to resources for housing assistance.

For a listing of speakers and to register for this session, click here.

Session 5: Behind Closed Doors – Substance Use, Mental Health, and Violence

1 CEs available for physicians, pharmacists, nurses, social workers, and psychologists through Rutgers University

Register

Substance use, mental health and violence are topics that are often taboo. They remain hidden and behind closed doors. They affect populations across the socioeconomic spectrum. Using healthcare as an access point to screen and address these issues, healthcare professionals can provide patients with a confidential and trusted source in which to seek support. When patients are ready to confide in their providers, it is imperative that clinicians are armed with the right questions to ask and the resources that are available to ensure that their patients’ gain access to the appropriate level of care. While substance use, mental health and violence have always been issues, recent world events have increased their prevalence.

At the completion of Session 5: Behind Closed Doors, attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the connection of substance use on health outcomes;
  • Discuss substance use with patients in a culturally and linguistically appropriate manner;
  • Offer patients available resources that meet with their needs and lifestyles;
  • Discuss the connection between substance use and violence;
  • Understand the effects of substance use on marriage, families and relationships, and interpersonal (domestic) violence;
  • Discreetly query patients about their safety at home; and,
  • Refer patients to resources that assist with domestic and community violence.

For a listing of speakers and to register for this session, click here.

Curbside Manner was generously funded by RWJ Foundation and WalMart Foundation.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Walmart Foundation